Chat, Bake & Share – Women Intercultural Dialogue Group

Join this lively morning session, an opportunity for Jewish, Muslim, Catholic and atheist women to open up to each other and talk frankly about each other’s culture and traditions on the 3rd December Sunday from 11 am. The event will be moderated by CEJI Training Coordinator Stephanie Lecesne. A baking show by a Moroccan baker will open the event and to connect women. All the food prepared during the event will be distributed to people in need.

Register by clicking here to attend.

CEJI's Brussels-based campaign to raise awareness of online hate speech

CEJI is taking part in React to Racism, a Brussels-based campaign to engage citizens and raise their awareness regarding the generalisation principle upon which racism is built. Our project, Respect dans ma ville, respect en ville (Respect in my city, respect online) aims to raise awareness of online hate speech and of ways for taking action, including using the eMORE mobile app.

Apply until 10th October for the Facing Facts online course on hate crime monitoring

Hate crime and hate speech motivated by racism, xenophobia, religious intolerance, homophobia, transphobia and disablism are a daily reality in Europe. However, most countries do not effectively monitor hate crimes or take the necessary steps to counteract it. Nor are victims provided with essential support. The Facing Facts Online training on hate crime offers the opportunity to learn how to identify, monitor and counter hate crime with support from experienced tutors and practitioners in the field. 

Intercultural dialogue for women

Join a morning coffee and a lively discussion around the theme  'The woman’s role in a today’s society' lead by our training coordinator Stéphanie Lecesne. The event is the third session of the Intercultural dialogue for women series and it will take place on 22nd October between 11:00-14:00 at the European Jewish Community Centre. If you wish to attend, please register here.

Fighting hate speech is a duty for Jews | Times of Israel blog

Jews are intensely aware of the power of speech. Words can be a source of inspiration, or they can be a catalyst for intolerance and violence. Within the Jewish psyche, there is a collective experience of the dangers of escalating hate, but there is also a theological basis for Jewish action on hate speech.   One of the gravest sins in Judaism is lashon-hara (literally, “the evil tongue”). The Talmud tells that the tongue is an instrument so dangerous that it must be kept hidden from view, behind two protective walls (the mouth and teeth) to prevent its misuse.

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